Saturday, July 7, 2007

Leave it to --- BEAVER!


The beaver. Ah, yeah, we’ve all heard those famous Leslie Nielsen movie lines… “Nice beaver.” And the response, “Thanks. I just had it stuffed.” Classic dialogue that’ll last forever. But when the Quiminology lab began to investigate the word “beaver” - well, we found ourselves stumped! There’s little or no source material available.

So we followed the logic to a time when hair was plentiful and razors hard to find. We ended up smack dab in fur trapping country around the late 1800s. Picture this - a man with tangled hair and a lot of beard gets his woman in a secluded grove, rips off her drawers in a frenzy of lust - only to find himself looking at something that would have brought in at least $25 on the open market. His dilemma? Trap it or fuck it? We like to think that lust won out over greed. And we also assume his date was a brunette - there aren’t many naturally blonde beavers.

But it’s a pretty good analogy. Furry, shiny (assuming a stream was around for bathing purposes) thickly curled - yeah, enough to make our trapper’s tools leap to attention. And the fact that beavers are associated with logs - well, of course all men consider themselves sequoias in the cock forest. It worked for us. The word “beaver” was henceforth part of our language and nestled comfortably between our thighs forever after. Dam good thing, too. (Pun intended.) Of course, when razors finally came into town…well, that’s a subject for another investigation by the Quiminology files!!!

8 comments:

Ciana Stone said...

LMAO!! Interestingly enough, when I was a child (yeah, way back in the stone age), living in a small southern town, Beaver was a common term used. "Going beaver hunting." "Knocked me off a beaver last night." That's what the young men would say. When I first heard that I was agast. Going to kill beavers? Knocking them off? With what? (Now I know it was that proverbial "log")

Thanks for the enlightenment. I'm not sure this is a term I'd want to use in a book, however. "His eyes moved slowly down her body, settling on her neatly trimmed beaver." Uh.... no

Ciana Stone said...

LMAO!! Interestingly enough, when I was a child (yeah, way back in the stone age), living in a small southern town, Beaver was a common term used. "Going beaver hunting." "Knocked me off a beaver last night." That's what the young men would say. When I first heard that I was agast. Going to kill beavers? Knocking them off? With what? (Now I know it was that proverbial "log")

Thanks for the enlightenment. I'm not sure this is a term I'd want to use in a book, however. "His eyes moved slowly down her body, settling on her neatly trimmed beaver." Uh.... no

Jaid Black said...

Dam, I loved that pun lol

Gwen K said...

thanks for saying that ciana. I don't want writers thinking to use beaver in their books now rotf

Jaid Black said...

Gwen, don't worry... I don't see that one happening :-P

Vivi Anna said...

The national animal of Canada is a beaver.

We have beavers on our money.

We our the land of giant hairy beavers.

LOL

Sahara Kelly said...

I have to agree. While it may be a common term, I can't see any references to buck-toothed rodents slipping into my love scenes. What a way to kill the heat of the moment. LOLLOL Discovery Channel Specials, yes. Hot passionate sex? No. Some of my heroes may be lusty animals in bed, but that's as far as it goes. :)

Jaid Black said...

Vivi, I've got one thing to say...

ROTFLMAO!!!!!!!!!!